Filmmaking and Gamemaking

How does collaboration differ in game development from film development?

How does collaboration differ in game development from film development?

My son is a game developer and fan of both computer games and films. I am not really a gamer myself, but I appreciate the power of interactive, participatory storytelling and the way some games have become more and more filmic and story-driven. I hope someday to be collaborating on games with my younger friends who are more literate in the medium.

Here’s a brief post that observes the difference in the type of collaboration that happens on film projects versus game projects.

Filmmaking and Gamemaking – The Difference

For the moment, I’ll keep learning and playing with ideas for storytelling that is compelling and influential yet highly participatory. I don’t believe that even the most complex stories in computer games has risen to the level of Shakespeare or Hemingway; perhaps that is not even the goal.

Games are already a larger entertainment phenomenon than film in terms of opening grosses ($300+ million in one day for Call of Duty 2) and active players. I hope to be a part of anything so influential.

Five Stages of Innovation

Five Stages of Innovation:

1. People deny that the innovation is required.

2. People deny that the innovation is effective.

3. People deny that the innovation is important.

4. People deny that the innovation will justify the effort required to adopt it.

5. People accept and adopt the innovation, enjoy its benefits, attribute it to people other than the innovator, and deny the existence of stages 1 to 4.

(Thanks to Clyde Taber via Josh Craft via Phil Cooke for the summary.)