The Theology of Screenwriting, Part 1: Sin | GoIntoTheStory

Filmmakers, even those claiming no particular religious faith, make use of themes that seem to resonate universally with human beings – and these are highly theological. This is not news to most people, but I like Scott Myers’ examination of theology and its use in visual storytelling. It’s in 5 parts.

Here is a link Scott’s exploration of “The Theology of Screenwriting” on his Go Into The Story blog.

The Theology of Screenwriting, Part 1: Sin | Go Into The Story.

Six lines. Three minutes.

What kind of film story can you tell with the limitations of six lines of random dialogue and a three-minute time limit.

What kind of film story can you tell with the limitations of six lines of random dialogue and a three-minute time limit. This film was recently shared with me, from a contest a couple of years ago. (Ridley Scott chose this winner.)

The contest, which received over 600 entries from around the world, invited aspiring filmmakers to create an original short film using the same six-line dialogue as the Cannes Lions award-winning Parallel Lines short films directed by RSA talents Carl Erik Rinsch, Greg Fay, Johnny Hardstaff, Jake Scott and Hi-Sim.

Commenting on his choice of winner, Sir Ridley Scott said: “I chose Porcelain Unicorn to be the winning film as it had a very strong narrative; a very complete story that was well told and executed.”

Learn to love limitations!

Mobile download for only .99 – Street Language film

Would you take a risk to save someone’s life? Check out our new short film, “Street Language”, now available for download and on DVD.

Would you take a risk to save someone’s life? Check out our new short film, “Street Language“, now available for download and on DVD. Click here to check it out.

Films With Benefits

Highlighting Joshua Station, one of the non-profit partners for our film, Street Language, nearing the start of principal photography.

(I won’t apologize for the reference to a certain current film that pursues an age-old, often-answered question.)

We are less than two weeks away from beginning shooting on our short film, Street Language. We’re doing rehearsals with actors, assembling equipment packages, gathering costumes and props, etc.

Because this film is multifaceted (it’s a mentoring project and resource for organizations working in urban centers), I want to highlight one of the partners in this project, Joshua Station. They are friends who are helping with advice, curriculum help, and we’ll introduce them to audiences at our screenings so people can make a difference themselves.

Joshua Station is a faith based community helping families make the transformation from homelessness to a healthy, stable living environment

Click Here to learn more about Joshua Station

We are really proud to be partnering with these great people who are making a real difference in the lives of homeless families in our area.

We also appreciate your financial support for this film – click here to donate through our IndieGoGo page

Filmmakers working together to open hearts

I posted a little while ago about a short film project called “Street Language” that we are producing here in Denver in the next couple of months.

I posted a little while ago about a short film project called “Street Language” that we are producing here in Denver in the next couple of months. We just launched our IndieGoGo campaign to raise a little money for the project. Most of the funds are coming from in-kind contributions by our professional and student crew members, community partners, and others who believe in the project.

Click the image, or HERE to see the campaign on IndieGoGo.

Really, it’s more than a film project. We are adding in transmedia elements like deeper storytelling pieces on social media, development of other resources for use by non-profits who will use the film later, etc.

If you read this, check out the campaign and please share it with your friends!

What Will It Take To Open Your Heart?

“Street Language” is a short film, now in pre-production.

A homeless teen and a businessman dying in an alley; their only hope is each other in Street Language.

Jacob lives an unseen life in the midst of the crowded city. When he stumbles upon Michael, bleeding in an alley, he must decide whether he can take the risk to help. In this moving short film story, a teenage street kid finds the strength to open up his life after a wounded stranger opens his eyes to the possibility of love and beauty around him.

Their journey together opens up both of their lives to the possibility of love and hope for the future.

We’re in pre-production on this short film here in Denver. I wrote the script and will direct the film. Chloe Anderson, of Epicenter Pictures, is producing the project as part our shared mission to mentor emerging filmmakers. Our crew consists of some seasoned professionals as well as students who want to hone their craft.

We plan to make the film available to other non-profit organizations who deal with issues of homelessness, hopelessness, and teens-at-risk.

Ministry of Presence (Nowen) – Urban Entry

More and more, the desire grows in me simply to walk around, greet people…Still, it is not as simple as it seems…

“More and more, the desire grows in me simply to walk around, greet people, enter their homes, sit on their doorsteps, play ball, throw water, and be known as someone who wants to live with them.  It is a privilege to have the time to practice this simple ministry of presence.  Still, it is not as simple as it seems…”

A friend of mine, Scott Lundeen, runs a ministry called Urban Entry here in Denver. He creates media resources to help envision and equip people to engage in relationships and service among the poor and marginalized in our communities. I think they’re doing some cool stuff.

This video was just posted on his blog site. It is based on a quote from Henri Nowen and gets right to the heart of a struggle we often face. Those of us who are acculturated for performance and delivering measurable results as a way of measuring our worth do well to consider Jesus’ call to be in relationship first. It’s what Nowen refers to as a ‘ministry of presence.’ Check it out.

Do you feel the same struggle in your vocation or avocation to make a difference in peoples’ lives? Do you feel envious of programs that get media attention or that are better resourced. Do you feel pressure to ‘achieve’ in a way that ultimately takes you ‘off the streets’?

I sometimes whine about my sad lot – that it’s difficult to see how I can sustain what God has called me to do, that I feel pressure to jump on the social media train that demands I become ‘famous’ in order to become influential and effective. But I feel God’s correction when I really am with the people I want to serve: with my film students, on Skype calls with friends in Africa who teach me as much as I want to teach them, these are the moments of reality and clarity.

My prayer for you is that you have many of those moments, even in the midst of the “necessary” things that shadow the life-giving things.